First Thought or Second? by Phillip Alder

Playing in the fifth session of the Continuous Pairs, you pick this hand:
West:     S 9 8 4     H 9 4     D A J 5 2      C K 6 4 2

With only your side vulnerable, the bidding goes:
  West      North     East      South
            1H        Pass      1S
  Pass      4C  (1)   Pass      4NT  (2)
  Pass      5H   (3)  Pass      6S
  Pass      Pass      Pass
(1) Splinter bid
(2) Roman Key Card Blackwood
(3) Two key cards but no trump queen

What is your opening lead?

This was the full deal:


Dlr: North            S A K 6 2
Vul: E-W              H K Q J 8 5
                      D Q 9 7
                      C 8
    S 9 8 4                        S 5 3
    H 9 4                          H 10 6 3 2
    D A J 5 2                      D K 8 4
    C K 6 4 2                      C J 9 7 5
                      S Q J 10 7
                      H A 7
                      D 10 6 3
                      C A Q 10 3


  West      North     East      South
            1H        Pass      1S
  Pass      4C   (a)  Pass      4NT  (b)
  Pass      5H   (c)  Pass      6S
  Pass      Pass      Pass
(a) Splinter bid
(b) Roman Key Card Blackwood
(c) Two key cards but no trump queen

South's use of Roman Key Card Blackwood would not meet with universal approval. (However,  Eddie Kantar claims that you should have at least second-round control in the fourth suit to make a splinter bid like North's. Maybe South is one of Eddie's disciples.)  As I picked up my score-card, I was going to write in the contract and an opening lead of the DA.  But then I made the fatal mistake of thinking some more. Eventually, expecting South to have the  DK and deciding my doubleton heart gave us some hope, I led the S4.  Now the contract is laydown. After winning the first trick with the S7, declarer should cash the _A,  ruff a club high in the dummy, play a trump to hand, ruff another club high in the dummy, play a  heart to his ace, draw trumps and run the hearts.  However, our South drew trumps immediately. On the second round, I dropped the H9 to tell  partner that my ace was in diamonds, not in clubs. However, by the time he had seen my third  trump, he had discarded a club. And he threw another club a moment later.

Conceding 980 was, of course, a complete zero.