The Wild One by Phillip Alder

You have to be so careful when you quote someone else. In the above article, I gave a deal featuring this auction:


            West      North     East      South
                      1Ht       Pass      1Sp
            Pass      4Cl

I footnoted North's 4Cl bid, stating that Eddie Kantar claims this splinter bid should guarantee at least second-round control in the fourth suit. Like someone out of Star Trek, and before the ink was dry, he materialized in the Press Room to point out that he thinks a four-level splinter should promise at least a second-round control in the fourth suit only when that splinter bid is above the fourth suit. So, as South can easily cuebid 4Di with a control, this splinter doesn't say anything about diamonds. I apologized profusely and assured Eddie that I would publish a correction in a later article.

Just to show that he holds no grudges, Eddie offered to let me chauffeur him and his girlfriend Yvonne on a few sightseeing trips this week, as none of us is playing in the pairs. What a guy! He shimmied out of focus and was no longer to be seen.

Later, to put frosting (icing, for non-American readers) on the cake, Kantar showed me some deals from his against Gabriel Chagas' team. The Brazilians reached 7Di on these cards:


            Sp A 4              Sp K Q 6 5 2
            Ht A 5 3            Ht 8 2
            Di A K Q J 9        Di 7 6 3
            Cl A 8 2            Cl K 5 4


This needed spades 3-3, which they were. Kantar's teammates stopped in 6Di.

Then came this pair of hands:
            Sp K J 3            Sp A Q 10 8
            Ht J 7 6            Ht A
            Di 5 2              Di A J 6 3
            Cl A K 10 8 3       Cl J 9 5 4

Kantar and Sontag reached 6Cl. North's opening lead was the Di K. Declarer cashed two top clubs, finding North had started with queen-third. Now Kantar tried to run the spades, but North ruffed the third round and cashed the Di Q. The Brazilians stopped in 3NT. This would have been defeated by a heart lead, but North selected a diamond.
On another board, someone (my lips are sealed!) doubled a Brazilian 3NT contract for no good reason and it rolled home with an overtrick.


The Americans mounted a comeback. It started with this board:


Dlr: North                      Sp A K Q J 6 5
Vul: N-S                        Ht A K 9 8 4 3
                                Di 4
                                Cl --
            Sp 8 3                                  Sp 9 2
            Ht Q 10 2                               Ht 7 6
            Di Q 8 3                                Di A 10 9 6 5 2
            Cl Q J 10 8 4                           Cl A 7 6
                                Sp 10 7 4
                                Ht J 5
                                Di K J 7
                                Cl K 9 5 3 2
America N-S:
            West      North     East      South
                      1Sp       2Di       2Sp
            Pass      6Sp       All Pass
Brazil N-S:
            West      North     East      South
                      2Cl       2Di       3Di
            4Di       5Di       Pass      6Cl
            Pass      6Di!      Pass      Pass!!
            Pass
Yes, West had explained that East's 2Di overcall was natural.

Soon after came this board:


Dlr: West               Sp K Q 10 3
Vul: None               Ht --
                        Di K 4
                        Cl Q 8 7 6 5 3 2
            Sp J 9 5 4                    Sp 8 7 6 2
            Ht K Q 10 6 5                 Ht A J 4 2
            Di Q 8 7                      Di 9 2
            Cl 10                         C l A 9 4
                        Sp A
                        Ht 9 8 7 3
                        Di A J 10 6 5 3
                        Cl K J
Brazil N-S:
            West      North     East      South
            Pass      1Cl       Pass      1Di
            1Ht       1Sp       3Ht       4Di
            Pass      5Di       Pass      6Di
            Pass      Pass      Pass
America N-S:
            West      North     East      South
            Pass      Pass      Pass      1Di
            1Ht       2Cl       3Di  (a)  Dbl
            3Ht       3Sp       Pass      4Cl
            Pass      4Ht       Pass      4Sp
            Pass      6Cl       All Pass
(a) High-card heart raise

On the Ht K lead, 6Di went three down. But 6Cl came home. Declarer ruffed the Ht A lead and played a trump. In a moment, he unblocked dummy's Sp A and ran all his trumps, squeezing West. Actually, West reasonably discarded a spade, hoping his partner had the ten.



This was the final nail in the Brazilian coffin:
Dlr: South                 Sp Q 6 5 2
Vul: None                  Ht 10
                           Di J 4
                           Cl A J 9 8 7 3
            Sp 10 9 4                     Sp A K 8 3
            Ht A Q 9 8 4 3                Ht 5 2
            Di 8 3                        Di 9 6 5
            Cl K 2                        Cl Q 10 6 5
                           Sp J 7
                           Ht K J 7 6
                           Di A K Q 10 7 2
                           Cl 4

            West      North     East      South
            Kantar              Sontag
                                          1Di
            2Ht       Dbl (a)   Pass      3NT
            Pass      Pass      Dbl (b)   All Pass
(a) Negative
(b) Telling partner not to lead a heart

Kantar led the Sp 10. After winning with the king, Sontag pushed a heart through to West's queen. Kantar switched to the Cl K. Declarer won with dummy's ace and called for a low spade. Sontag won with the ace and led his second heart, to the jack and ace. A second club play allowed East to take two tricks in the suit for two down. What a great deal for the unusual agreement about this double.