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What does WinShake do?...

(The current page tells you exactly what WinShake can do for you in all Windows versions, ranging from 95 to 8.1.

But if you're using Windows 7 or 8(.1), especially with Aero enabled, this special page is just for you!)

 

Well, it has seven different functions, that can be used in the following ways:

 

Function:

Nr:

MMB or Ctrl Click:

Icon:

HotKey:

Show Desktop

  1

2x Clock / Start

Click

Alt-Win-D

Reset*

  2

2x Clock / Start /

Click + Ctrl-Shift

Alt-Win-D-Shift

.

  .

Title Bar + Shift

(0/1 open window)

Alt-Win-S-Shift

Shake

  3

2x Title Bar

Click + Shift

Alt-Win-S

PeekX

  4

1x Title Bar

.

Alt-Win-A

Peek

  4

1x Clock / Start

Click + Ctrl

Alt-Win-Space

Quick Peek & Flip

  4

0x Clock / Show Desktop

.

Up/Down/Right/Left/Wheel

Auto Taskbar

  5

0x Taskbar Button /

.

.

. . . Peek & Switch

  .

. . .Left/Right Screen Edge

.

Win-Alt-`/MMB/Wheel

Taskbar Peek

  5

1x Taskbar Button

.

.

PeekTop

  6

1x X-Button

Click + Ctrl-Shift

Alt-Win-Z

PeekTopX

  6

2x X-Button

.

Alt-Win-X

Select PeekTopX

  6

2x X-Button + Shift

.

Alt-Win-X-Shift

NumWheel

  7

.

.

NumPad Keys

 

*Reset is NOT the same as restore! See function 2 below.

 

And in the following places:

In the Yellow and Red bordered regions, you can click the Middle Mouse Button one or two times to use all the different functions.

But with Quick Peek and Auto Taskbar enabled, you can also just hover over the Red bordered regions,

and with Auto Switch enabled the Pink regions, to let them do their trick.

To see what trick that is, you can simply try it of course, or you can continue reading...

 

1. First of all, it is an improved version of the Show Desktop icon in your Quick Launch Bar (9x/ME/2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008) or the Windows 7 Show Desktop Button. With WinShake Control running, you can also access Show Desktop by double clicking the Middle Mouse Button at (the right of) the clock in the Taskbar or on the Start Button (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1)).

As you know, the original Show Desktop function shows the desktop by removing everything, including Side Bars, Gadgets and such. Not this one. This one only removes minimizable windows. And for those, the XP-original usually "forgets" which one was on top, when restoring them. WinShake remembers the one on top. In Windows 7 Show Desktop often causes windows to become "Always-On-Top" by mistake. WinShake doesn’t make that mistake.

 

Another problem with the original is that when you use it to show the desktop, then open another program, after which you want to restore the previous windows again, you're out of luck. They can only be restored by the original as long as you don't start any new programs in between. WinShake doesn't care what you do in between.

It restores everything you had open before and even keeps the current active window on top and puts the previous active one right below it, simply by again clicking the icon, or double clicking the Middle Mouse Button at (the right of) the clock in the Taskbar or on the Start Button.


2. But then what if you actually want to start all over with a clean desktop and make sure the previous windows do not come back anymore when you click the icon? That can simply be done by using the Reset function: just hold Shift while double clicking the Middle Mouse Button at (the right of) the clock in the Taskbar, on the Start Button or on the Title Bar of a window (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1)). Or you can click the icon holding Ctrl-Shift, with no more than ONE open window (9x/ME/2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008).

 

 

3. The function where WinShake gets its name from is the Shake function.

You might have seen Aero Shake in Windows 7. This is similar, only a little different: by double clicking the Middle Mouse Button on the Title Bar of the window (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1)), or by holding Shift while clicking the icon (9x/ME/2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008), the active window is shaken for you and all the other windows are minimized, keeping only the one you were working with on a clean desktop. And contrary to the original, WinShake can even shake maximized windows.

By shaking again, the other windows are restored and the previous second one on top is put back right below your current active one.

 

 

4. The fourth trick: the (Quick) Peek & Flip and PeekX functions. (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1))

Any idea yet what this does?...  Indeed, it is similar to Aero Peek in Windows 7: just click the Middle Mouse Button at (the right of) the clock in the Taskbar or on the Start Button, or hold Ctrl while clicking the icon, and all windows become transparent, leaving only their borders. But whereas Aero Peek only lets you peek through the windows, WinShake makes the desktop really accessible, while still keeping the order of all windows in tact and without minimizing any.

 

If you just want to quickly Peek at the desktop, hovering over the right edge of the Taskbar, next to the clock, is enough though (delay can be set). Afterwards everything returns to as it was before, even if you were using PeekTop(X) at the time. But by pushing the Right or Left arrow key or turning the Mouse Wheel, you can also Flip through all open windows, similar to Windows Flip in Vista. Now the Up arrow or the Left Mouse Button activates the current window, or pushes it to the bottom of the stack. With the Down arrow or the Right Mouse Button you can minimize it. In Windows 7 or 8(.1) the Show Desktop Button can also be used, but you have to enable this first, possibly followed by a restart to stop its default behavior.

 

However, if you’re using Windows 7 or 8(.1) with Aero enabled, you can also choose to use the Aero Enhanced feature. This improves the original functionality of the Show Desktop Button. It uses Aero Peek to take a quick Peek at the desktop, but now the Left Mouse Button activates WinShake Show Desktop, while the Right Mouse Button activates WinShake Shake. And on top of that in 7, with the Mouse Wheel you can Flip through all windows using Windows Flip 3D, complete with the Left and Right Mouse Button activating or shaking the selected window. The Middle Mouse Button still keeps all functionality without Aero Enhanced available.

 

By clicking the Middle Mouse Button on a window's Title Bar, all windows become transparent except the one you clicked on, so you can for example drag something between this window and the desktop. A PeekX alternative to shaking the window.

When using WinShake Control, there is also a ToolTip shown with the Title of the window when hovering over its border. By clicking the Middle Mouse Button on the border itself or on this Title ToolTip, only that window is returned to normal, so you can work with that one.

Clicking the Middle Mouse Button again on the Title Bar or anywhere else on the desktop or in the window, returns all other windows to normal again as well. You can also again click the Middle Mouse Button at (the right of) the clock in the Taskbar or on the Start Button, or hold Ctrl while clicking the icon, to return all windows to normal.

Choosing any other function except PeekTop(X), first returns all windows to normal, after which it performs the other "trick" you asked for. Switching between Peek and PeekTop(X) keeps the necessary windows Peeked.

 

 

5. And the fifth function is (Auto) Taskbar Peek & Switch. (XP/2003/Vista/2008)

This is very similar to the true Windows 7 Aero Peek function, making it possible to Peek at a window: when clicking the Middle Mouse Button on or, with Auto Taskbar enabled, just by hovering over (delay can be set) one of the program buttons, all other windows become transparent, leaving only the desired one to look at. You can use this to quickly find a window in real size, making it easier to see the differences between them. Or maybe you just want to take a Peek at one without actually switching to it.

 

By hovering over a Grouped Taskbar Button, its menu automatically opens, so you can Peek at these windows too. Even minimized windows can be Peeked at!... As long as they've been open long enough for WinShake Control to take a SnapShot of them, that SnapShot is being shown in real size on the position where the window was when the picture was taken. And when you click on a SnapShot, the actual window is restored.

You can leave this Taskbar Peek mode by simply moving the mouse away from the Taskbar, or by clicking the Middle Mouse Button again, if you don't want to switch to a new window. Or of course with the Left Mouse Button in case you do want to switch.

And when you just want to do something with the window you're peeking at first, before leaving Taskbar Peek, you can keep Taskbar Peek mode open by holding Shift or Ctrl.

 

But by enabling Auto Switch you can also quickly switch between windows, without clicking the mouse, with the ease of "Windows 8"-like swiping, from the Taskbar towards the desktop, but still with the beauty of "Windows 7"-like peeking, in real size instead of thumbnail size. The screen edges (or when using Windows 8(.1), the upper corners), set through Auto Switch, even activate Alt-Tab, complete with mouse wheel support. By moving the mouse away from the edge again, you switch to the selected window. And by sliding along the edge, you cancel Alt-Tab (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1)).

With Auto Taskbar or Auto Switch enabled, you can also open and close the Start Menu/Screen just by hovering over the left edge of the Taskbar.

 

 

6. Then there are the PeekTop and PeekTopX functions. ("2000"/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1))

PeekTop is based on Peek, but only slightly: when you click the Middle Mouse Button on the X-Button in the Title Bar of the window, or you hold Ctrl-Shift while clicking the icon with at least TWO open windows, it makes the active window semi-transparent (level can be set), so you can work with it and read what's underneath at the same time. When there are "Always-On-Top" windows that might block your view, they are Peeked.

On Windows 2000 the active window is Peeked as well, not made semi-transparent.

You can again click the Middle Mouse Button on the X-Button of the window, or hold Ctrl-Shift while clicking the icon, to return the windows to normal.

Choosing any other function except Peek, first returns the windows to normal, after which it performs the other function you asked for. Switching between PeekTop(X) and Peek keeps the necessary windows Peeked.

 

PeekTopX is a variant of PeekTop: by double clicking the Middle Mouse Button on the X-Button in a window’s Title Bar, that window and its Taskbar Button disappear completely. Handy when nosy people are around...  Any "Always-On-Top" windows present are Peeked. If there are more "confidential" windows, you can select/deselect those in advance (or afterwards), by holding Shift while double clicking the Middle Mouse Button on their X-Button, so that they too will be hidden.

Double clicking the Middle Mouse Button again on the X-Button of any window, makes the hidden window(s) reappear and the Peeked windows return to normal.

This function, however, is disabled by default and can only be enabled when you have administrator rights.

 

 

7. And the final function is NumWheel. (2000/XP/2003/Vista/2008(R2)/Win7/2012(R2)/Win8(.1))

 

This function is especially useful for laptop users with NumPad keys. Most laptops only have two mouse buttons under the touchpad, and when it comes to scrolling with a touchpad, not everyone is as happy with that either. And even if you do have a mouse, if your mouse has no horizontal scrolling, or you just need to scroll a lot, NumWheel can be useful as well.

With NumWheel enabled (by double clicking on the Tray Icon) and NumLock turned off, you can use the four NumPad arrow keys as a Mouse Wheel. The middle 5 key functions as your regular Middle Mouse Button, and the Ins and Del keys are now the #4 and #5 Mouse Buttons, usually set to Previous and Next.

These all function as if they were part of a real mouse. The new Middle Mouse Button can of course be used for most of the other WinShake functions. And in the Control Panel you can set the scroll speed, just as you normally would.

The remaining Home, End, PgUp and PgDn keys are for scrolling whole pages, as you would expect. And combined with Ctrl, they jump straight to the beginning or the end. However, they follow the window your mouse is hovering over.

 

 

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